TUES June 19th Hearing: Oppose Nuclear Reactor Wastewater

 

DHEC PUBLIC HEARING:

Proposed Wastewater Discharge Permit

for  New V.C . Summer Nuclear Reactors, Units 2 & 3

TUES June 19th, Doors open 6PM Hearing begins at 6:30PM

White Hall AME Church, 8594 SC Hwy 215 S. Jenkinsville, SC

 

Attend this Public Hearing and comment to oppose pollution into the Broad River and the new SCE& G nuclear reactors at V.C. Summer in Jenkinsville, SC.  Columbia is directly downstream.  Carpools from Columbia being organized, departing ~ 5pm.  CONTACT David, 803-215-3263.

Attend the hearing or submit comments via mail/email

(Click READ MORE for more info including contact info for comment)

 

 

The Department of Health & Environmental Control (DHEC) regulates the discharge of

pollutants to waters in South Carolina via an NPDES permit.  This permit regulates discharges of sanitary

wastewater, low-volume waste, cooling tower blowdown, and alternate mixing water (Monticello Reservoir water) from one discharge point to the Broad River at the Parr Reservoir.

 

COMMENT: Provide comments at the hearing or give DHEC written comments no later than close of

business Friday, June 22, 2012.  Forward comments to Melanie Townley (note notice # 12-063-H):

SCDHEC/Bureau of Water, 2600 Bull Street, Columbia, SC  29201 or townlemk@dhec.sc.gov.

 

http://www.scdhec.gov/environment/water/

http://www.scdhec.gov/environment/water/publicnote/html/PublicNotice.ashx?pnid=871

 

Gaffney Hearing on Nuclear Reactors, THURS Jan 19

 

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Hearing

on two new reactors Duke plans to build near Gaffney.

THURS Jan 19th, 1-4PM or 7-10PM.

Restoration Church, 1905 N. Limestone St.

With demand for power decreasing, questions need to be asked as to why rate payers need to be on the hook for $10 billion for this risky business.  Citizens can testify at either of the two sessions.

Information/ carpooling from Columbia, contact Elaine, 803-348-011 / irafcooper  @ earthlink.net

Questions or comments for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission: contact sarah.lopas@nrc.org

 

French nuclear workers say conditions worsen

PIERRELATTE, France (Reuters) – Worsening working conditions, inadequate pay rises, pressure to work faster and safety concerns — these are the familiar grievances of a disaffected work force.

When such complaints arise in France’s most sensitive industry — nuclear power — alarm bells start ringing.

Cyril Bouche and his colleagues at the Tricastin nuclear plant in the rolling hills of the Drome region say the state-owned utility EDF, which runs France’s 58 nuclear reactors and has been expanding into the United States and Britain, is not only cutting costs, but also cutting corners.

French nuclear workers say conditions worsen

Will Jenkinsville , South Carolina be the Center of the Nuclear Industry’s Revival?

In the gymnasium of an elementary school in Blair , South Carolina , staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) gathered to listen to public comment on the potential environmental impact of two new nuclear reactors proposed for construction V.C. Summer Nuclear Station in nearby Jenkinsville.

“You have insight and knowledge that we don’t,” NRC Project Manager William Burton told the crowd of around 100 people. “We want you to participate in this decision. An educated consumer is our best customer.”
After a short presentation by NRC staff, Jenkinsville Mayor Gregory Ginyard was not impressed. “I live a mile and a half from the plant,” he stated. “I’m the mayor. They want me to represent them. And I don’t know what you want. Where I live we don’t have environmentalists. You guys need to educate us. The people of Jenkinsville, we are on the front lines.”

Full Article

March 21: Bonnie Rait No Nukes Benefit Concert

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
FOR MORE INFORMATION:
January 13, 2009
Tom Clements, 803-240-7268
Susan Corbett, 803-609-6343
Bonnie Raitt Announces a Special Becky Hardee Memorial
No Nukes Benefit Concert in Columbia, SC
Columbia, SC – Nine-Time Grammy Winner and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame member Bonnie Raitt will perform with her band at the Township Auditorium in Columbia on Saturday, March 21, at 8:00 PM for a special Becky Hardee Memorial No Nukes benefit concert. The Randall Bramblett Band will be joining her as a special guest. Tickets will go on sale Friday, January 16th at 10:00 AM, at the Township Auditorium Box Office and all Ticketmaster outlets or charge by phone at (800) 745-3000. A limited number of Gold and Silver Circle seating ticket packages, including an after show reception with Bonnie, are available for purchase through the Guacamole Fund at www.guacfund.org.

“I’m very pleased to be coming to Columbia, South Carolina again to support the great work of these organizations and honor the memory of my friend and no nukes activist Becky Hardee,” said Raitt.
Funds raised will help support the efforts of the SC Chapter of the Sierra Club, Friends of the Earth-South Carolina, the Nuclear Information and Resource Service Southeast and Nuclear Watch South. Among others, these efforts include stopping the licensing of the V.C. Summer Nuclear Power Plant Units 2 & 3 in Fairfield County, SC, other new commercial nuclear power plants being proposed in the Carolinas and Georgia, and ending the dumping of surplus weapons-grade Plutonium and the proposed reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Augusta, GA. These organizations support conservation and efficient use of resources, safe energy technologies, and a non-nuclear future.
The concert is i n memory of Mary Rebecca “Becky” Hardee, a South Carolina native who died in 1996 following an extended struggle with ovarian cancer. In the mid-1970’s, Hardee co-founded the Palmetto Alliance, a statewide network of citizens raising concerns about the siting of national nuclear waste processing and disposal facilities in South Carolina. She served on the Board of Directors of Musicians United for Safe Energy (MUSE).
Becky also educated South Carolinians about other threats to the natural environment. She worked with community groups to combat industrial pollution and harmful waste disposal practices, and was instrumental in efforts to close the hazardous waste dump at Pinewood, SC. In addition to her activism, she also worked as an educator and later as an attorney. Becky Hardee will long be remembered as an individual of extraordinary strength, will power, and ethical character. Her memory is honored by this memorial concert, but h er legacy is enriched by the continued work of the dedicated activists who continue to fight for the protection of the natural environment.

Beneficiaries
SC Chapter of the Sierra Club
http://southcarolina.sierraclub.org/ Susan Corbett, Chair, 803-609-6343. SC Sierra Club is the largest environmental group in the state, and one of the only groups challenging the issues of new nuclear power, nuclear waste and reprocessing. The Chapter has filed with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to intervene in the licensing of the V.C. Summer plants. The Chapter also opposes the dumping of tons of deadly weapons-grade Plutonium at the Savannah River Site (SRS), as well as the proposal to re-start the reprocessing of spent fuel, the technology that created the current stockpile of high level waste at the site, with no permanent dispo sal solution.
Friends of the Earth-South Carolina http://action.foe.org/pressRelease.jsp?press_release_KEY=450 Tom Clements, 803-240-4268
FOE is a national environmental organization, that has had a campaign presence in South Carolina for one year and works on the host of nuclear issues that make South Carolina a nuclear ground zero.  Primarily, FOE focuses on the four new nuclear reactors and is currently the only public interest group actively intervening before the S.C. Public Service Commission against approval for new SCE&G reactors. FOE is also the main watchdog over SRS nuclear programs.
Nuclear Information and Resource Service Southeast
http://www.nirs.org & nbsp;Mary Olson, 828-675-1792
Nuclear Information and Resource Service, founded in 1978 by grassroots activists fighting the construction of new nuclear power plants at that time, exists to support local action towards a sustainable, non-nuclear energy policy. The NIRS Southeast Office, founded in 1999 serves as a “field office” supporting activists opposing new nuclear power reactors and irresponsible nuclear waste programs in the Southeast.
Nuclear Watch South
http://www.nonukesyall.org/ Glenn Carroll, 404-378-4263
Nuclear Watch South is a Georgia, volunteer-based organization, active in nuclear power, nuclear waste and nuclear weapons issues using strategies which include public education, legal intervention and direct action. It currently leads a multi-organization intervention before the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in opposition to the proposed plutonium MOX fuel factory at Savannah River Site. Nuclear Watch South is a key playe r in keeping alive and on the table the environmentally preferred plutonium immobilization option utilizing existing high-level radioactive tank waste at SRS.
NO NUKES Y’ALL

Opposition to Nuclear Power (published in State Newspaper)

Dear Editor:

As a well-published cancer epidemiologist (over 230 articles in peer-reviewed journals), public health professional, and concerned citizen who has followed the nuclear energy debate for the past 30 years I am strongly opposed to proposed nuclear power plant construction near Columbia.

From a health perspective, there is plenty of evidence that ionizing radiation is extremely deleterious to human health in the moderate to long term. Cancers in adults have an average latency period of around 20-30 years; in children, this period of cancer development can be much shorter. There is no way to guarantee containment of the very carcinogenic materials associated with nuclear power over a moderate period of time (i.e., decades).  So, it is very likely that rates of cancers and birth defects (which can appear relatively quickly) will increase if this very poorly thought out plan were put into effect.

From an economic perspective, irrespective of the huge costs that may be incurred when health risks are increased, this plan is equally absurd. Alternative forms of energy will be less expensive (and much less toxic), even in the short term.  They will become much cheaper with serious investments in research and development that are promised by the new administration.  Reverse (or net) metering will allow inventive individuals to generate electricity for the grid, thus accelerating innovation and reducing costs to an even greater extent.  Amortizing costs will make alternatives, such as wind and solar, much less expensive in the moderate to long term; and especially when costs of waste disposal (which appear simply to be discounted to zero by passing them on to future generations) are taken into account.

Sincerely, Dr. James R. Hebert, Columbia

Public comment continues at PSC/SCE&G hearings

Though the press was notably absent, the S.C. Public Service Commission opened the floor for more public comment shortly after 4:30 this afternoon. Council for SCE&G renewed its “continuing objection” to what it claimed is a violation of the corporation’s right to due process.

Following is a transcript of my prepared testimony before the Commission:

“On Monday, council for SCE&G entered a continuing objection to public testimony being entered into the official record of these proceedings on the ground that it violates the corporation’s due process rights under the 14th amendment to the U.S. Constitution. That objection was renewed this evening. I should like to object to the notion that a corporation is a person with all the rights accruing to real human persons. I object that such a legal fiction, combined with the virtually limitless financial resources of a multi-billion dollar corporation, as SCE&G is, renders the rights of real human persons negligible in the face of corporate hegemony. I am aware, of course, that the Courts of the United States have ratified this myth of corporate personhood and that this commission has no authority to set aside the Supreme Court’s errors. But that is my continuing objection to these proceedings.

“Taking, for the sake of argument, SCE&G’s claim of personhood with its attendant rights at face value, I should like to testify that SCE&G is a bad corporate citizen and cannot be trusted to answer to anyone but their shareholders. Case in point: in the past, SCE&G was granted monopoly status to sell electricity and natural gas in Richland County, in exchange for a promise to provide public bus transportation. This, of course, cut into their profits, because public transportation is rarely if ever a profit-making venture. How to get out of a service contract when it is not to the other party’s advantage to release you? Prove yourself so dreadfully incompetent that they will beg you to go away! Which is exactly what SCE&G did. They mismanaged the local bus system so badly, or should I say so skilfully, that they were able to boast to their stockholders that they had cut ridership in half before Richland County Council allowed them to buy out their obligation. I offer this expample as character testimony – if you base your ruling on the preponderance of  the evidence, you must consider who is more likely to be telling the truth and who is likely to do what they say they will do. Past behavior indicates that whatever SCE&G promises to do will be tempered, in the end, by the bottom line.

“So, what of SCE&G’s current record as a corporate citizen? Perhaps they have reformed.

“In the summer of 2008, Carolina Peace Resource Center and the Southern Energy Network partnered on a listening project in the Jenkinsville community.  For people who are accustomed to being ignored, to having decisions made for them without being consulted, simply being asked about their day to day lives can be a profound experience. It reveals a story we seldom hear about the cost of progress.

“Many community members expressed serious concerns about the health and safety implications of living near a nuclear reactor.  Many said they could not hear the sirens during disaster drills, that no one knew what to do in the case of a nuclear accident.  SCE&G had provided no evacuation plans or other important information.  Others could point from house to house on their streets, naming who had suffered or died of cancer, or lost a loved one to cancer.  Older residents remembered the days before Virgil C. Summer Unit One came online and said they believed the rising cancer rates were connected to the reactor. 

“Even those who were not concerned for their health and safety understood the financial ruin that would come from a 37% increase for SCE&G ratepayers.  None could understand why SCE&G would make them pay for the new units when their community had suffered so much already.  Jenkinsville is not a prosperous community. Google Jenkinsville, SC, businesses (which I did this afternoon) and nine of the top ten listed are on I-26 – more than ten miles away. Number 10 is in Winnsboro, more than 18 miles from Jenkinsville.  If SCE&G is granted this rate increase, many citizens of Jenkinsville will not be able to keep their lights on – yet they will bear the brunt for the rest of us who claim to need those reactors.

“I should not have to come before you to represent the community of Jenkinsville, but in Jenkinsville, many people work more than one job; they cannot afford to take time from work and drive to Columbia.  Besides, they do not believe anyone here cares about them. Before any decision is made, this Commission has a duty to visit Jenkinsville, host a town meeting there and solicit public comment.  It is the least you can do for a community that is sacrificing so much!

“Jared Diamond, in his recent book Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed, points out that creating a mess is often profitable, but cleaning up ones own messes is never profitable. Therefore, corporations can be expected to walk away from every mess they make, if possible, leaving it for taxpayers to bear the cost. So not only does SCE&G want us to pay for them to make a nuclear mess – they will most likely skip out in the end and leave it for future generations to clean up – or die trying.”

After compMy name is Arnold Karr. I am the Director of the Carolina Peace Resource Center, which is a nonsalaried position, and I live at 935 Main St. in Columbia.

On Monday, council for SCE&G entered an ongoing objection to public testimony being entered into the official record of these proceedings on the ground that it violates the corporation’s due process rights under the 14th amendment to the U.S. Constitution. I should like to object to the notion that a corporation is a person with all the rights accruing to real human persons. I object that such a legal fiction, combined with the virtually limitless financial resources of a multi-billion dollar corporation, as SCE&G is, renders the rights of real human persons negligible in the face of corporate hegemony. I am aware, of course, that the Courts of the United States have ratified this myth of corporate personhood and that this commission has no authority to set aside the Supreme Court’s errors. But that is my ongoing objection to these proceedings.

Taking, for the sake of argument, SCE&G’s claim of personhood with its attendant rights, I should like to testify that SCE&G is a bad corporate citizen and cannot be trusted to answer to anyone but their shareholders. Case in point: in the past, SCE&G was granted monopoly status to sell electricity and natural gas in Richland County, in exchange for a promise to provide public bus transportation. This, of course, cut into their profits, because public transportation is rarely if ever a profit-making venture. How to get out of a service contract when it is not to the other party’s advantage to release you? Prove yourself so dreadfully incompetent that they will beg you to go away! Which is exactly what SCE&G did. They mismanaged the local bus system so badly, or should I say so skilfully, that they were able to boast to their stockholders that they had cut ridership in half before Richland County Council allowed them to buy out their obligation. I offer this expample as character testimony – if you base your ruling on the preponderance of  the evidence, you must consider who is more likely to be telling the truth and who is likely to do what they say they will do. Past behavior indicates that, whatever SCE&G promises to do will be tempered, in the end, by the bottom line.

So, what of SCE&G’s current record as a corporate citizen? Perhaps they have reformed.

In the summer of 2008, Carolina Peace Resource Center and the Southern Energy Network partnered on a listening project in the Jenkinsville community.  For people who are accustomed to being ignored, to having decisions made for them without being consulted, simply being asked about their day to day lives can be a profound experience. It reveals a story we seldom hear about the cost of progress.

Many community members expressed serious concerns about the health and safety implications of living near a nuclear reactor.  Many said they could not hear the sirens during disaster drills, that no one knew what to do in the case of a nuclear accident.  SCE&G had provided no evacuation plans or other important information.  Others could point from house to house on their streets, naming who had suffered or died of cancer, or lost a loved one to cancer.  Older residents remembered the days before Virgil C Summer Unit One came online and said they believed the rising cancer rates were connected to the reactor. 

Even those who were not concerned for their health and safety understood the financial ruin that would come from a 37% increase for SCE&G ratepayers.  None could understand why SCE&G would make them pay for the new units when their community had suffered so much already.  Jenkinsville is not a prosperous community. Google Jenkinsville, SC, businesses and nine of the top ten listed are on I-26 – more than ten miles away. Number 10 is in Winnsboro, more than 18 miles from Jenkinsville.  If SCE&G is granted this rate increase, many citizens of Jenkinsville will not be able to keep their lights on – yet they will bear the brunt for the rest of us who claim to need those reactors.

I should not have to come before you to represent the community of Jenkinsville, but in Jenkinsville, many people work more than one job; they cannot afford to take time from work and drive to Columbia.  Besides, they do not believe anyone here cares about them. Before any decision is made, this Commission has a duty to visit Jenkinsville, host a town meeting there and solicit public comment.  It’s the least you can do for a community that is sacrificing so much!

Jared Diamond, in his recent book Collapse: How Society Choose to Fail or Succeed, points out that creating a mess is often profitable, but cleaning up ones own messes is never profitable. Therefore, corporations can be expected to walk away from every mess they make, if possible, leaving it for taxpayers to bear the cost. So not only does SCE&G want us to pay for them to make a nuclear mess – they will most likely skip out in the end and leave it for future generations to clean up – or die trying.”

Thanks to Sara Tansey, who wrote most of my remarks on the listening project.